NSES Content Standard F 
Science in Personal and Social Perspectives: Risks and benefits
Grades 5-8, page 169

Risk analysis considers the type of hazard and estimates the number of people that might be exposed and the number likely to suffer consequences. The results are used to determine the options for reducing or eliminating risks.

Benchmark 3B The Nature of Technology: Design and Systems
Grades 9-12, page 52
Risk analysis is used to minimize the likelihood of unwanted side effects of a new technology. The public perception of risk may depend, however, on psychological factors as well as scientific ones.

Benchmark 3C The Nature of Technology: Issues in Technology
Grades 6-8, page 56
New technologies increase some risks and decrease others. Some of the same technologies that have improved the length and quality of life for many people have also brought new risks.

Benchmark 3C The Nature of Technology: Issues in Technology
Grades 9-12, page 57
In deciding on proposals to introduce new technologies or to curtail existing ones, some key questions arise concerning alternatives, risks, costs, and benefits. What alternative ways are there to achieve the same ends, and how do the alternatives compare to the plan being put forward? Who benefits and who suffers? What are the financial and social costs, do they change over time, and who bears them? What are the risks associated with using (or not using) the new technology, how serious are they, and who is in jeopardy? What human, material, and energy resources will be needed to build, install, operate, maintain, and replace the new technology, and where will they come from? How will the new technology and its waste products be disposed of and at what costs?

Science for All Americans The Nature of Technology:
Chapter 3, page 32
Analysis of risk, therefore, involves estimating a probability of occurrence for every undesirable outcome that can be foreseen--and also estimating a measure of the harm that would be done if it did occur. The expected importance of each risk is then estimated by combining its probability and its measure of harm. The relative risk of different designs can then be compared in terms of the combined probable harm resulting from each.